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Vermont Travel Guide for the Southern Vermont Region



(View Statewide Listings)


Region 11: Southern Vermont

There are three main areas in this region:
Brattleboro Area, Great Falls Area, and Mount Snow Area.


Welcome to Southern Vermont, where you'll find an extraordinary variety of outdoor activities, arts, entertainment, shopping and much history.

Background Information on the Southern Vermont Region...

Brattleboro Area:
Nestled between the West and Connecticut Rivers, Brattleboro and the surrounding villages, provide visitors with an extraordinary variety of indoor & outdoor activities, arts & entertainment, and of course shopping! It's also a regional center for commerce, finance and technology.

Brattleboro is a unique town that is best savored slowly. This region hosts some of the best small inns and bed and breakfasts in the state, so stay a while and explore. Take some time to visit the theaters, art galleries, music centers and museums. Brattleboro is listed as one of the Top Ten Art Towns with populations less than 30,000 in the book THE 100 BEST ART TOWNS IN AMERICA, written by John Villani. Modern Brattleboro's economy is healthy and growing, primarily because the town has diversified its industrial and commercial base. Numerous businesses here provide stable employment. Brattleboro is a forward-looking town with a proud past.

Great Falls Area:
Whether you're planning a weekend get-away or full season escape, the Great Falls area of Southern Vermont offers vibrant villages, relaxing retreats and outstanding adventures for families, individuals, couples or companies.

Grafton is one of the prettiest villages in Vermont. Many of its beautiful old buildings have been lovingly restored by its residents and the Windham Foundation. What you see today looks much like it did years ago, along with more modern conveniences like a country store, lodging, restaurants, art galleries, cheese factory, and museums. The tree lined road to Grafton truly gives you a taste of Vermont. Grafton is a quaint town with a population of around 600 people. The lovely village green and brick church were built in 1833 by the Congregationalists. The Grafton Inn, Grafton Cheese Co. and other historic sites make this a favorite place to visit.

Westminster holds a special place in Vermont's history. It is the oldest town in the State, established in 1735, the Westminster Massacre of 1774 marked one of the pre-revolutionary skirmishes between colonial forces & colonists, and it was in Westminster, in 1777, that Vermont declared itself an independent nation.

Rockingham includes the incorporated village of Bellows Falls on the Connecticut & Saxtons Rivers, Cambridgeport, and a large rural area west of Interstate 91 with Bartonsville, Rockingham Village, and Brockway Mills.

The village of Bellows Falls is an economic hub in the area, with a small retail base as well as restaurants, entertainment venues, historic sites, and lite manufacturing. Bellows Falls has many Victorian through 1920's homes and has an active arts, music and literary community. Available transportation includes Amtrak, Vermont Transit, Connecticut River Transit & Green Mountain Railroad excursion trains.

Mount Snow Area:
Dover showcases a number of well-preserved buildings. The visual center of town, the West Dover Inn, with its wide columned porches, remains an unspoiled example of vernacular Greek Revival architecture, and is the area's oldest continuously operating hostelry. Across the street, the Harris House, one of the oldest houses in the village, and is now home to the Dover Historical Society. The Handle Road in West Dover represents a most unique summer colony in Vermont. Bostonians and New Yorkers began buying up old farms in 1858 and devoted great energy to restoring them to their original condition. Several of these houses remain in the holding of these original summer families.

Separated geographically by "challenging" terrain, East and West Dover developed separate identities over the years. The development of Mt. Pisgah into the Mount Snow Ski Resort in 1954 has fueled the West Dover area's growth as a world-class vacation destination, while East Dover has maintained its quieter rural appeal. Together with their fine inns, restaurants, natural attractions and bucolic scenery, they provide a definitive Vermont experience.

Wilmington was a parcel ("land grant") sold by Lt. Governor Benning Wentworth of Massachusetts. There were contests between the arriving Connecticut settlers and the New York Albany County Sheriff, which led to the formation of "The Green Mountain Boys" when Sheriff Tenecht said of Ethan Allen, "I'll chase those boys back into those damn Green Mountains." A second surge of settlement took place in the 1830s and by the late 1800s, a third surge of travelers was arriving by rail. That lasted until the late 1920s, when the railroad finally succumbed to the harsh weather and hard economic times. The current wealth of visitors began in the 1930s with the dedication of "The Molly Stark Trail" (Rt. 9) and car traffic replaced the train.

Walk in any direction from the stoplight in the village of Wilmington and you'll come upon superb examples of 18th and 19th century construction. In as many as eight distinct architectural styles - from Late Colonial (1750-1788) to Colonial Revival (1880-1900), the architecture is so well preserved that the major part of the village has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. A stroll through the Village of Wilmington provides a visual journey back in time, with many houses restored and some yet to be. A shoppers Mecca of privately owned specialty shops, restaurants and a pub, Wilmington has such an attraction of events, activities, demonstrations, shopping and dining that visitors are encouraged to use the parking areas on E. Main Street and walk to the Historic District (W. Main Street).


Towns of the Southern Vermont Region include:
Athens, Bellows Falls, Bondville, Brattleboro, Brookline, Cambridgeport, Dover, Dummerston, Dummerston Center, East Dover, East Dummerston, East Jamaica, Grafton, Guilford, Halifax, Jacksonville, Jamaica, Londonderry, Marlboro, Mount Snow, Newfane, North Brattleboro, Putney, Rawsonville, Rockingham, Saxtons River, South Londonderry, South Newfane, Stratton, Stratton Mountain, Townshend, Vernon, Wardsboro, Wardsboro Center, West Brattleboro, West Dover, West Dummerston, West Guilford, West Halifax, West Townshend, West Wardsboro, Westminster, Westminster Station, Westminster West, Weston, Whitingham, Williamsville, Wilmington, Windham

Information was obtained from the Vermont Department of Tourism
and various area Chamber of Commerce websites.

Thank you for mentioning Vermont.com when contacting these businesses!

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Stratton Mountain Resort
5 Village Lodge Road
Stratton, VT 05155

more info | visit website

The Grafton Inn
92 Main Street
Grafton, VT 05146

more info | visit website

Magic Mountain
PO Box 396
Londonderry, VT 05148

more info | visit website


Magic Mountain
PO Box 396
Londonderry, VT 05148

more info | visit website

Stratton Mountain Resort
5 Village Lodge Road
Stratton, VT 05155

more info | visit website

The Grafton Inn
92 Main Street
Grafton, VT 05146

more info | visit website


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